New Mercies: Keren Fuhrmeister
mercy-ships-podcast-new-mercies-episode-48-keren-fuhrmeister-feature

Beauty from Ashes

Keren Fuhrmesiter was happy working as a dietician in Australia when God started to prepare her for something new. She didn’t know what that was or how it would unfold but had two desires: she wanted to travel and live close to the sea. Volunteering for Mercy Ships, God has met both her desires. As Hospital Director of the Africa Mercy and soon for the Global Mercy, she not only lives on the sea but also travels for her role.

In this episode, Keren tells how God took a time of loss in her life and brought something new. She shares the incredible joys of working with the medical staff aboard our ships as well as interactions with patients and their families who have impacted her most. Keren’s faith and stories are sure to bring encouragement to your day!

Mercy Ships has brought hope and healing to those who need it most for over 40 years. Using hospital ships, we are able to provide safe, free surgical care to those in need and bring medical training to healthcare workers living the countries we serve.

Looking for a way to join our mission of bringing hope and healing? Partner with us through a giftvolunteering with us, or by joining us in prayer.

New Mercies Podcast Transcript

Welcome to the New Mercies, a podcast by Mercy Ships, where we’ll take you behind the scenes and on board our incredible hospital ships that are transforming lives all over the world. We invite you to join us each week as we sit down with our crew, patients, volunteers, and partners to hear their stories of life-changing hope and healing.

Keren Fuhrmeister from Australia is currently the hospital director on board the Africa Mercy, and soon she will assume that title on board the Global Mercy. Keren is an extraordinary woman who carries hope as she leads our medical teams. Get ready to be uplifted by this incredible woman. Here is my interview with Keren Fuhrmeister.

Raeanne Newquist:

Keren, welcome to New Mercies.

Keren Fuhrmeister:

Thank you for inviting me to come.

Raeanne:

The purpose of the podcast is really just to hear what God is doing — what He has done and what He is doing through Mercy Ships. And so I’m thrilled to get to hear a little bit of your story today — what God has been doing in and through you, as you are currently serving onboard the Africa Mercy. So as we get started, tell us where you’re at and what exactly you’re doing in these days. And then we’ll dive into how you got to where you are.

Keren:

I’m on the Africa Mercy as the hospital director. It didn’t start out that way, but I am the hospital director and we’re in very much the tail end of our field service. The last week of surgeries is happening right now and we’ve got two more weeks until the hospital closes. So I would say it’s kind of like being at base camp, we’ve got the final ascent to Everest, feels like that’s where we’re at right now. And we’re nearly there and got some great patients that we are trying to get to the end too.

Raeanne:

What kind of surgeries are you guys doing in these last two weeks?

Keren:

Yeah, so we’re doing maxillofacial surgeries and general surgeries. And at the tail end at this point, we are normally doing less complex surgeries so that they’re able to not be in the hospital for too long after surgery, so that we can discharge them home. Because, unlike other hospitals that continue, ours closes up. And so we need to make sure that patients are cared for after they’ve had their time in our hospital. So that’s where I’m at now, we’ve got a few quite complex patients that we’re trying to discharge and trying to look after them and make sure that they are going to be all set up for when they go home.

Raeanne:

I know that it’s a lot of work. And I know this final push can be a tough one because everyone is pretty wiped out. What is the general feel of the crew right now on board coming into this homestretch? How can we be praying specifically for the crew?

Keren:

Good question. One of our crew members says everything’s slightly under control-ish. Which feels kind of chaotic. But it’s mainly that I think we’re just, especially the long-term crew, are quite tired. But there’s an excitement that builds when you are nearly at the point of seeing the end in sight. And it’s not because we want to say goodbye to our patients or our day crew, because that’s the hard part of the bittersweet end. But I think we just need a break and we’re needing a little bit of a breather!

Raeanne:

That’s a great request to throw out to all of our listeners, pray for the crew and these final couple of weeks of surgery that God would empower them and give them strength, adequate rest and just endurance to finish. Keren, you mentioned that you are the hospital director on board, which is very exciting. That’s a big job. Before we get there, why don’t you tell us what was going on in your life and your career before Mercy Ships that prompted you to drop everything and go volunteer?

Keren:

Yeah, it was definitely a crazy time that God ordained to get me here. I was a dietician, I’ve worked clinically in hospitals for a number of years, mainly in management. I was in a job that I loved, I had quite a large team that I really enjoyed leading, I had designed and built a house and I really enjoyed that too. I thought I would be in the position that I was for at least five years or so. Not that I had a five-year plan. But it was one of those things where I thought I was pretty settled. And then God was really starting to work on the fact that I needed to be ready for something. I just didn’t know what the being ready was going to be for. I was kind of getting a steering that maybe something would change, but I had no idea what it was. And so I ended up having a conversation very with my CEO of the hospital who said we’re going to restructure and your job is going to be restructured out of existence and so long story short, I ended up getting notice to leave my job on a Monday and it was finished on a Friday. After nine and a half years in the organization that I was in, and I was nearly finished studying, I was doing a master’s at the time. This unsettledness from God had led me to, caused me to look into whether I should sell my house, even though it kind of was a crazy notion at the time. And so within two weeks, I’d lost my job and sold my house. I sold it in three days. And so I very much ended up with — what do I do now God? and I had absolutely no idea what was next. And so during this kind of tumultuous time, I was home at Christmas time, and the National Geographic Mercy Ships documentary was on, and we have it on free to air television and in Australia, and I was watching it. And my auntie jokingly said, you should go and do this. And I was like, Ah, no, no. And that was at the time where I thought my job was settled. And then a few months later, I was not settled anymore. And so, then I applied the last day I was moving out of my house, I had an interview at 5:30am, to come to Mercy Ships. And so here I am!

Raeanne:

You know, it’s kind of incredible to hear a story on the other side of it. But I’m sure in the midst of it, that was a really devastating and hard season of life for you, I mean, losing your job, you just finished building a home, selling that home, and then kind of just having these open hands of what’s next. How did that mindset or attitude take you into Mercy Ships?

Keren:

I came very much with open hands, because pretty much everything I knew was gone. But there was also the fact that God had been preparing me to be ready for something I just didn’t know what that looked like. And I kind of jokingly prayed to God that I would love to travel and I would love to be near the water whenever I found a new job, expecting that it would probably be in Australia. And now I live on the water. I definitely have gotten pretty much the furthest away from Australia that I could get. So I joke about that. But it was very much where I think the attitude of really wanting to see what God had for me, meant that that’s where I’ve ended up and he’s blown me away with what he’s provided for me in this new season. Really, for me that just continues to go on. I’m actually on my third-year anniversary of coming on board today.

Raeanne:

Oh, wow. Congratulations! So, you had this major life change that brought you to Mercy Ships, coming with open hands and a lot of expectancy. What was your original commitment when you got on board?

Keren:

I committed for two years, eventually, after multiple options, I ended up working in human resources as assistant director of HR on the ship. And the original commitment was two years and people at home are like you’ve never been how do you know you’re going to like it? And I was like, well, they’re not going to lock me up and not let me go home. But I’m not going expecting that I’m going to dislike it, I’m expecting that this is very much from God. And that’s actually what turned out. And I now look back and I remember walking up the gangway and I knew it would be longer than two years, I just had a feeling. And I think my family kind of knew it too, that this was probably not going to be a short-term stint on board, this was going to be something that was more apt calling it a longer-term prospect for me, which it kind of is now. People ask me now how long are you going to be there? And I kind of jokingly say until I’m not or if God says otherwise, then I’ll go home. But at the moment, I’m just here till I’m not.

Raeanne:

After your two-year commitment was up, and I know that you like many people we’ve spoken to on the podcast, you were in the midst of some very strange years with Mercy Ships with the pandemic and whatnot, time when the hospital wasn’t even open or functioning. But after your two-year commitment, what was it that caused you to say I’m going to sign up for more?

Keren:

Mine was a bit of a strange kind of path because I was quite happy in HR and really enjoying that. But we were then looking forward to having two ships, and so they said to me have a look at whether there’s other jobs that you would like to do. I headed down the path of looking into going to a hospital director role and that’s what ended up happening. But then two weeks before I was supposed to take over, I ended up having to go home due to COVID and the ship having to stop being in Senegal. And so I did work remotely at home for a year which was very strange because timewise, I was always working in the middle of the night! But it was a really good period of time to really get to know the organization. I called myself a pseudo hospital director because I really didn’t have a hospital and I wasn’t even on a ship.

But then after that period, I came back and worked at home in a hospital and then came back to the ship, March 2021. And the day after I came out of my quarantine period of seven days on board, it was announced that Mercy Ships was going to delay coming back to Africa until January 2022. And so I was looking down the tunnel of eight months of being on a ship, you know, shipyard kind of waiting. And God really worked in that season with me, because I really had to trust that there was no accident that he bought me back to live on a ship in in the Canary Islands, he really did show himself during that time. And my faith definitely strengthened in that period, because I really questioned why God put me in this place when I don’t even have a hospital to direct and my role was very fluid and flexible. I asked, what are you going to grow in me now? And what actually is my job? And how do I define it? Last year was one of those crazy times, but I ended up doing so many things on board and I got to know so many people and do a number of jobs. And that was really good for my growth.

Raeanne:

You really have to have a reckless abandon to go through some of this, actually, to be a follower of Jesus you have to have a lot of reckless abandon. But you also just constantly have to be letting go of your preconceived ideas, sometimes letting go of dreams, letting go of all these ideas that we have to really trust that God has our best in mind, and he is at work, and he is doing something that we might not know what it is right now. And actually, in some cases, we might never really know what the end result is. But we do know that if we are where he has placed us, if we are in obedience, it’s the best possible place we can be.

Keren:

And I do think he has proved over and over my life, even if I just have one puzzle piece at a time, that he will care for me. And I think mostly he’s come through it the 11th hour and really 11 hour, but he definitely has always come through. And I think I’ve learned so much more about trusting him and giving control over of the things that I wished I could control. I’m in a way better spot than I was before. And you know, I thought I was my faith was pretty strong when I came here. That would be a joke, because really, it is definitely refined and definitely strengthened.

Raeanne:

I just heard a pastor talking about this concept of how do you trust a God who constantly goes off script. And I thought that was so funny. I thought Yeah, you know, that’s a good way of putting it. We think that we know where we’re headed, we think that, you know, God has called me to go serve with Mercy Ships, I’m going to go do this and live on a ship with a hospital, boom, God went off script, all of a sudden, you’re working remotely from Australia. And like you said, with the time change, you’re working all night — everything’s crazy. There isn’t even a hospital. But God is constantly up to something that we know nothing about. And he has this great plan to just seek and save the lost in the greatest way possible. And what an honor to get to be a part of the work of God and the story that he’s weaving in each and every one of us.

Well, as the hospital director, tell us a little bit about what you do. What does that job look like day in and day out?

Keren:

My team is quite large, I basically I’m kind of the conductor and trying to connect everyone off the same sheet of music is basically my job. But really, I oversee all the operational side of running a hospital on a ship. So all my teams work directly with the patients, but I make sure that they’ve got all the resources they need, the equipment and all the bits and pieces they need to do their jobs. And so generally, we have about 145 crew, but that can be up to 190. And on the new ship that will be bigger still, that actually do the direct patient care. About half of the general crew is medical staff. So that’s a lot of the ship that is that works in the hospital. And so my main job day to day is to look after the leaders of each of the different teams. We have everything from the start of the patient’s journey, which is off ship at the Hope Center, all the way through until they’re discharged from outpatients and rehab. So I manage all the teams that are in between that and make sure that I can support my leaders as much as possible because they’re the ones that look after their people that then look after the patients. I love my job.

Raeanne:

That’s pretty neat, because you probably get to build relationships with all of these frontline workers, the ones that are day in and day out with the patients. And through that, you get to know all of the stories that are happening with the patients in the hospital, which really is the secret sauce of Mercy Ships — to know, the stories of the patients, their backstory, their story of transformation, it’s really what fuels all of us to keep going, it’s so powerful. Can you tell us about a patient that has impacted you?

Keren:

As you’ve just mentioned, there’s so many I do get to hear and talk about and see a lot of the patient stories and hear about them. So it’s really hard to actually pick one, but we recently had a patient named Douda and he had a tumor in his mouth. He’s 13 and he came with his father who had gone had all over Senegal to try and get surgery for him. And he had tried so many places, sold so many of his possessions and spent so much of his money trying to get surgery for his much loved child and was failed over and over again. And I just can’t imagine that, as a parent, what that would feel like. Pretty much Mercy Ships with the last option. And he came, even though his village told him that this time wouldn’t work, either. And so his son had surgery here. And as the hospital director, I also have the privilege of asking our general crew to pray often. And for this particular patient we prayed as a whole ship. And I sent a message out to everyone and said, Please pray on behalf of our lovely patient, and so what ended up happening was he had the surgery a lot quicker than we expected and ended up without a huge amount of scarring either.

But the thing that sticks with me and really the point of this story is that I was in the operating room office just near the operating room, and we’ve got a TV screen where we can see what’s happening inside. And they were taking the father into the post Anesthesia Care Unit where the patient will wake up. And so we had gowned up their father in all the sterile gowns and shoe covers and hat and everything, and trying to explain to him through the translator that he was going to the exam. And so he walked through the doors, and I looked on the TV screen, and I watched as he saw his son for the first time after the surgery. And I don’t think I’ll ever forget the look of relief, his whole body kind of joined him in this relief of my son has got this surgery I’ve been searching for for 10 years. And you could see the weight lifted off him because it just was so tangible. And you could just see it and I wasn’t even in the room, I was just watching it. And it wasn’t till later that one of the post Anesthesia Care nurses said to me, he said thank you in every language he knew, because he went through Wolof, and French and English and anything just to say thank you, thank you. And I still watched that screen for a number of minutes afterwards, because he just sat next to the bed and held his son’s hand. And just like looked with complete and utter relief. And that for me was, I said to one of my colleagues here, I said that made my year and made every minute in our work that I do here make sense. That what I do can make a difference — I just cannot fathom that. But somehow we could make a difference, and I might be just a very small part, but I can help make that difference for him and many others. Crazy, but it was an amazing story. And it just sticks with me now.

Raeanne:

That is so powerful. What a privilege to get to witness that. And it’s something that so many of us will never know — that desperation of wanting to care for your child or your loved one and not having the resources to be able to do it. We just can’t relate to that. And to see that weight lifted off of him, that doesn’t just change the life of his son, but that changes his life and impacts a whole village, which is so incredible. I know that y’all have had some really crazy times, especially in the last couple of weeks, as we talked about having to pack up the whole entire ship and move in a couple of days, because of some needs they had at the port and how stressful and overwhelming that is. But then you have these moments where you say, You know what, it is all worth it, because I just saw this man, after 10 years of waiting, be able to have the relief of knowing that his son is going to be okay. And it makes it all worth it.

Keren:

It’s such a tangible thing when you see someone go from having something that couldn’t be fixed, and then to be able to see them come out of that and to walk through all the emotions of what that looks like. We had a another mother this week where her little baby had a cleft lip. And I just wondered, you know how as a mother, you give over your child to the strangers on a big white tin can and say please do something for me. And afterwards, we saw her with tears streaming down her face, because her little darling now would be able to smile properly. And this cute little baby had little dimples that we saw previous to the surgery, and she would stick a little tongue out between her cleft lip and you’re just like, you may not know us ever except hear the story your mom tells how you got surgery. But we’ve now been able to change her life for the better. And the gratefulness we see from the patients, but they may never see all the logistics and all the things that go on behind the scenes, but it is what it takes for them to get that miracle or that answer that they’ve been longing for in their lives. And yeah, that makes this job very worthwhile.

Raeanne:

I think what’s really special about Mercy Ships is in a regular hospital, we don’t have the opportunity to just walk into a hospital room and get to know a patient, you don’t get to know their stories. But when you are a crew onboard the ship, whether you are medical, obviously the medical people get to see the patients all the time, but people who are working in HR, people who are working in the galley or what have you, they have opportunity as well to witness the life changing things that happen onboard the ship with our patients. And that is such an incredible privilege of knowing that everyone is a part of it, everybody contributes. And everybody has opportunity to go visit the patients in the hospital when we don’t have COVID restrictions, but has opportunity to really engage with these people and build relationships. And I think that that is so special, and really a unique part of this very unconventional life.

Keren:

Very unconventional! I often will talk to our new crew that are here and I say to them, You are not here by mistake, because we pick each bed space that we have so carefully. Because we make sure that what we have is what we need to do our jobs. But that doesn’t matter what position you’re in, we’re all hope carriers because we’re carrying the hope of not only healing from surgery, even if you are working in the galley, or the dining room or cleaning or teaching our kids — we also carry the hope of Jesus. And so it’s a double whammy really. We need everybody and I think that is very unique, but it’s good that there are people that don’t work directly in the hospital that have such an opportunity to mix with those that do and also to see our patients as well. It’s very unique.

Raeanne:

It is a very unique environment, very non-conventional life that you are currently living. So tell us what do you enjoy most about this crazy, wild life that you’re living on board a ship?

Keren:

Yeah, it’s definitely crazy. I think the one thing that we always talk about here is that people, and most of your guests probably say the same thing, but the community itself is something you never normally have. You could talk to anybody anytime of the day, it doesn’t matter. If you got up at 12am or 2 in the morning, you could go to the dining room and probably see somebody! there’s always somebody to talk to. There’s always someone from a culture different to yours that you learn about, I know my language and the things that I say and even what I name things has completely changed because people need to understand each other. So we use different terminology. So, you know, I don’t say rubbish, I say trash now, because then people understand. We just get to mix with so many different people that have such rich stories that kind of rubs off on each other. So I think that people is one of the big things that I really enjoy. That is the part that really makes this place special. Yes, it’s a ship, but it’s the people that make it and they are really a family for me. I would have to spend at least 35 hours on a plane to get home, and so my family is really far away. But these people become your family, because that’s who you have.

And if you’re going through a hard time, I recently had a death in a family, and they become the people that support you and are the ones that know what’s going on. And I think you get good at meeting new people and expanding your heart to cope with the comings and goings, because you have to say a lot of goodbyes here. But you can also say, Hello and I now have friends across the whole world where I could go visit. And today with so many different people in so many different areas that I think that makes us richer, but I think I’ve learned to really be grateful for such little things that I wouldn’t have otherwise thought of in my life, just the cabin space that you have, the small joys from every day, I feel like I’m a lot more grateful and intentional about being aware of them and being grateful for them. But there’s also the fact that I just love that you can do lots of adventurous things as well on your time off, or you can go places, to different countries etc. But also you just have such purpose behind the work that you do. And that’s the thing that I got kind of a bit burned in my last job. And coming here, just being a complete comparison to be able to say, I just work with such passionate, amazing people that I am so privileged to work with, and I can’t believe I get do this. And I wake up everyday thinking, this is amazing, I would have never thought my life would look like this.

Raeanne:

You had mentioned in the very beginning, when you were praying in the midst of your transition of losing your job and selling your home, that you wanted to live by the water and you wanted to travel. Now most people know that with Mercy Ships, you stay in the same port for 10 months. So the ship is not just sailing around from country to country all year long. But you do have opportunity to travel on days off and taking extended time off and so forth. Tell us a little bit about your travels and adventures over the past three years since you’ve been with Mercy Ships.

Keren:

Obviously with being in Senegal itself, you can do more local travel, which is great because you get to see a whole different side of the main port city. I also went to Italy earlier in the year and had three weeks break from the ship and had someone cover my job, which was great. I went in and explored around there which fabulous and just a change in scenery, lots more greenery and fresh air than we otherwise would get here. But that was amazing. And so there’s obviously the opportunities to go back and forth to the US where our Support Center is with Mercy Ships, and then to Europe. And so it is especially where we are in Africa that you can go up to quite close countries that are nearby, but complete changes of scenery. And the countries are all so different here, some with amazing beaches and also with very much desert like and so you can get a taste of so many things. But then Europe is just a jump across. But then I also lived in the Canary Islands, we were on a couple of different islands there and they themselves are volcanic. So they’re very different in the way that they look and so they’ve got amazing mountains and greenery and then you go to some amazing beaches. So I’ve really been very blessed to even travel during these COVID times because a lot of people were locked at home and I got to do the world travel I’ve been praying about really.

Raeanne:

Oh, that’s so great. Did you ever think that this is what your life would look like when you were back in Australia? You know, working in the hospital, did you ever imagine that you would have this adventurous life?

Keren:

No. I kind of felt like God had more for me in some way than what I was currently experiencing. But I was never able to either verbalize or imagined it really, because this was not one of those things. I don’t even think I could even think up this. In the Bible, it says God is able to do more than we hoped or imagined, I couldn’t even imagine this one. And he keeps blowing me away with what he gets me to do. Because sometimes I’m like, this is just crazy, how am I going to do this? But yeah, I’ve been able to then go ahead and do some wild things, really. And there’s a lot of I suppose normality living in one place, you don’t commute, you just walk down the hall and go to your job. And so in some ways, there’s some normality in what we do day to day. But overarching, it’s just a crazy life. We live our lives on a ship in Africa with, you know, 400 other people. I never thought that would be my life.

Raeanne:

How are you different because of Mercy Ships, how has your life been impacted thus far?

Keren:

I think you get more than you give here. You think you’re coming to serve our patients, to serve a purpose where there is a really big need in the world, and people can’t access surgery. And so on paper, that just sounds like a great calling, and a great thing to do. But I think, for me, internally, I’ve changed so much in the last three years. I think it’s made me more trusting of God than I would have ever thought possible. The book of John talks about us being the branch and God’s the vine and basically, I’ve learned that I just need to be a branch every day I wake up, I don’t have to be the tree, I just have to be the branch and I go ahead and be the best branch I can. But it is based on the fact that I’m connected to the main vine. And that is my purpose. And so I’ve found that there’s a lot of freedom and rest and peace and calmness that comes with that, in that I don’t have to kind of get up and go, How am I going to solve the problems? Or how am I going to run the hospital? Or how am I going to fix the issue or move the birth space? Or how am I going to solve a COVID outbreak or whatever the situation is? It’s how are we going to do it? Or how are you going to do it God and how can I be partner with you in that. And I found that to be the way that I’ve kind of survived this crazy place. A lot of the time it’s it can be good and hard at the same time. And I think you said it’s the hardest job you’ll ever love. But for me has been the hardest thing I’ve ever done, as well. And I think that it’s good not to over romanticize this place. Like it’s really, really tough. And I don’t think it’s good to say it isn’t because I think that’s just wrapping it up and saying that something that is really tough, doesn’t have the impact that it does. And the only way I’ve learned to survive and thrive here is mainly because I really trusted God to work through me and to change me and he definitely has. And I think that’s more than what I’ve got out of this place. And rather than what I give, like what I give pales in significance compared to what I get.

Raeanne:

I love how God’s economy works. That you receive far more than you could ever give. And that is just the way that he works, you know, just blessing his kids constantly, which is so special. Keren, I know that you are the hospital director on the Africa Mercy, that as we all know, the Africa Mercy is about to wrap up and go for about a year of an overhaul to get up and running in a better fashion so that she can continue serving Africa for many years to come. But you will be transitioning over to the Global Mercy in this next season as the first ever hospital director on board. So congratulations. That is so exciting for you. Tell us as we wrap up our time here maybe one thing that you’re looking forward to as serving as the hospital director on the Global Mercy.

Keren:

Yeah, thank you for that. So I’m super excited and pinch myself again that I get to this opportunity because this really is amazing when you see the pictures and the footage of what this new ship is like, and I got to see it recently when it was here in Dakar for a little while earlier in this year and it was is amazing. I think the thing I’m looking forward to, it goes back to the people again. But I have an absolutely amazing team here and I know that we get the opportunity to have not only the people from this hospital team that will transition over with me, but also we join with a number that have already been getting the hospital equipped over there. And we’ve put them all together, and they’re all in it and I feel like we can achieve so much together. And I just love my job and love that I can work with this group and that I get the privilege to not only lead them, but follow them too because there’s just some amazing people that really know their jobs are super skilled and make me look good really. But I’m really, really looking forward to that part of it. And I think the challenge that this new platform brings, because no one’s ever done a ship designed and operated this way, and I think there’ll be a lot of problems that are going to come, but I’m just looking forward to seeing what is achieved with this vessel. And the more lives that can be changed, like I talked about, I’d love to see the reflection of that balance, as I was talking about in more and more faces as we go through next year. And as we set up on this new platform, so I’m super excited. It’s going to be great.

Raeanne:

Well, Keren, I know that God is so great at bringing beauty from ashes, and this season in your life where your job dissolved in Australia, and the new home that you built was sold seemed like ashes, that everything was falling down around you. But wow, God has really brought some incredible beauty into your life with this new chapter with Mercy Ships and as it continues, as you move to the Global Mercy, we’re just thrilled for you. And we will continue to pray for you and pray for the crew as they wrap up these next couple of weeks of field service in Dakar, Senegal. Keren, thank you so much for sharing a little bit of your journey with us today and we just wish you many blessings in the years to come.

Keren:

Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. And thank you for your prayers, everybody. It’s one of the things that gets us through and you can partner so much with Mercy Ships by doing that. We covet it and need it, and it gets us where we’re going and partners with us in the ministry. So thank you so much.

For more information about Mercy Ships, go to mercyships.org, and to keep up with the guests on New Mercies, follow us on Instagram at NewMerciesPodcast.